Interdisciplinary Teaching in Rural Settings to Enhance Multidisciplinary Team Care: The RIPL Effect

Nov 03, 2019

The Network: TUFH and Social Innovations Partners are thrilled to announce the latest edition, “The Network: Towards Unity for Health (TUFH) Social Accountability and Interprofessional Education.” We had the pleasure of again partnering to bring you this special edition featuring global health pioneers working across sectors to improve the quality of life for citizens in ecosystems throughout regions around the world.

In 2019, we see global trends emerging such as an increased focus on social and environmental determinants of health, dramatically rising health care costs, and increasing inequity in health outcomes. Layered with advances in data and information technology, these conditions have become more apparent to the public. We also are seeing a new era of social accountability. Social Accountability and Interprofessional Education have been identified as critical best practices to drive better health outcomes. However, there still exists a gap between systemic implementation and adoption and this blueprint for more equitable, sustainable, and holistic health care. We believe this edition is an important step in moving towards closing this gap to improved health care for all people.

We are excited to feature the talented practitioners of this “Network of Networks” who are building the bridge to the future through the health field and their articles that shed light on a promising path forward to improved health care and outcomes for people across the globe. We hope you too learn from these individuals operating at the cutting edge of global health and incorporate their best practices into your work, ideas, and policies that will help to shape our collective future and make improved care a reality for all people.

The eight article is

Interdisciplinary Teaching in Rural Settings to Enhance Multidisciplinary Team Care: The RIPL Effect

Our article describes a rural interprofessional learning (RIPL) program that has been integrated into the curriculum of the Bathurst Rural Clinical School, as well as our evaluation of the effectiveness of this type of teaching and the benefits we believe are gained from working in a team to deliver best health outcomes for rural Australia.

Read the full article here.

 

Authors

Dr. Sandra Mendel is a Senior Lecturer in Rural Health at the Bathurst Rural Clinical School and a General Practitioner in Orange where she has been a Rural Generalist for the last 20 years. 
Karen Beattie is a Critical Care Nurse and Associate Lecturer in Clinical Skills Education at the Bathurst Rural Clinical School. 
Jane Thompson is the Rural Program Coordinator at the Bathurst Rural Clinical School. She is committed to growing the future rural health workforce. 
Dr. Robyn Vines is a practicing Clinical Psychologist and a Senior Lecturer in Mental Health at the Bathurst Rural Clinical School.
Dr. Kam Wong is a local General Practitioner and a Senior Lecturer in General Practice at the Bathurst Rural Clinical School.
Dr. Jannine Bailey is a rural health researcher and Senior Lecturer in Rural Health & Research at the Bathurst Rural Clinical School.
Krista Cockrell is a Research Officer at the Bathurst Rural Clinical School and Casual Academic at Western Sydney University. She is a trained paramedic and has practiced in both the U.S. and Australia in a range of emergency and industrial environments.  
Buck Reed is an Associate Lecturer in Paramedicine and a paramedic who has practiced for more than 20 years in various areas of pre-hospital care including event medical services and industrial paramedicine.
Associate Professor Tim McCrossin has been a consultant pediatrician in Bathurst for more than 20 years and is the Clinical Dean for the Bathurst Rural Clinical School. 
Professor Ross Wilson is the Director of Rural Health at the Bathurst Rural Clinical School and has been a General Practitioner in Bathurst for more than 30 years.  


Other news