The Prospects of a Community-based Nutrition and Education Intervention During the Recovery Phase of a Disaster as Experienced on the Ground

Oct 06, 2019

The Network: TUFH and Social Innovations Partners are thrilled to announce the latest edition, “The Network: Towards Unity for Health (TUFH) Social Accountability and Interprofessional Education.” We had the pleasure of again partnering to bring you this special edition featuring global health pioneers working across sectors to improve the quality of life for citizens in ecosystems throughout regions around the world.

In 2019, we see global trends emerging such as an increased focus on social and environmental determinants of health, dramatically rising health care costs, and increasing inequity in health outcomes. Layered with advances in data and information technology, these conditions have become more apparent to the public. We also are seeing a new era of social accountability. Social Accountability and Interprofessional Education have been identified as critical best practices to drive better health outcomes. However, there still exists a gap between systemic implementation and adoption and this blueprint for more equitable, sustainable, and holistic health care. We believe this edition is an important step in moving towards closing this gap to improved health care for all people.

We are excited to feature the talented practitioners of this “Network of Networks” who are building the bridge to the future through the health field and their articles that shed light on a promising path forward to improved health care and outcomes for people across the globe. We hope you too learn from these individuals operating at the cutting edge of global health and incorporate their best practices into your work, ideas, and policies that will help to shape our collective future and make improved care a reality for all people.

The fifth article is

The Prospects of a Community-based Nutrition and Education Intervention During the Recovery Phase of a Disaster as Experienced on the Ground

This article focuses on innovation as a nutrition intervention which will aid and protect vulnerable young children along with their mothers who are mostly women of reproductive age during the recovery phase of a crisis or disaster situation. This nutrition strategy combines complementary feeding of local-based complementary foods (for the children) and nutrition education (for their mothers or caregivers). The participation (involvement) of the children in nutrition intervention during the rehabilitation phase of a disaster is a contribution towards ensuring healthy survival and development within the age group of children 6 months to under 3 years of age. While the participation of mothers involves educating them in terms of food, nutrition and health which are approaches to empowering these women. The community or the temporary shelters where the affected families are located shall be the setting for implementation. Involvement of the community officials and community workers are needed to implement the innovation. The community workers shall be empowered through training on how to implement the intervention. The impact of the innovation may be gauged on the improvement or maintenance of the normal nutritional status of children participants while the effects of nutrition education among mothers could be measured in terms of knowledge gained and translation of knowledge to practice in their daily lives. 

Authors

Julieta B. Dorado is a Supervising Science Research Specialist at the Department of Science and Technology, Food, and Nutrition Research Institute. Her work focuses on food and nutrition intervention assessment and policy-related researches. Her academic background is on sociology, social development and communication. She can be reached at juliebdorado@yahoo.com.

Emily O. Rongavilla is a Science Research Specialist II and a Nutritionist-Dietitian by profession at the Department of Science and Technology, Food, and Nutrition Research Institute in the Philippines. She is engaged in nutritional assessment studies, nutrition intervention, and evaluation and advocacy studies. Emily can be reached at emierongavilla@yahoo.com.au.

Joanne Jette L. Semilla is a Science Research Specialist I and a Nutritionist-Dietitian by profession at the Department of Science and Technology, Food, and Nutrition Institute. She is involved in nutrition intervention, monitoring, and policy research studies. She can be reached at jjlsemilla@gmail.com.

Rowena V. Viajar is a Science Research Specialist II at the Department of Science and Technology, Food, and Nutrition Research Institute in the Philippines. Her research focuses on nutritional assessment, nutrition intervention, monitoring and evaluation, and policy research. She can be reached at wenavelasco@yahoo.com.

Dr. Mario V. Capanzana is currently the Director of the Food and Nutrition Research Institute, Department of Science and Technology. His contributions to the country’s development in food and nutrition include research and technology development in food fortification, functional foods, technology transfer, food quality and safety, and food product development. He has several patents and utility models credited to his name as inventor. Dr. Capanzana can be reached at mvc@fnri.dost.gov.ph.


Other news

Cookies help us deliver our services. By using our services, you agree to our use of cookies. Learn More